LETTERS

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May 15, 2009

Scav not an insular, polarizing event

As a captain of the MacPierce Scav Hunt team for the past two years, I’d like to think that I am in a good position to say that Tim Murphy could not be more wrong (“Picking Off Scavs,” 5/12/2009).

As a captain of the MacPierce Scav Hunt team for the past two years, I’d like to think that I am in a good position to say that Tim Murphy could not be more wrong (“Picking Off Scavs,” 5/12/09).

He writes that Scav polarizes the student body, but offers no evidence beyond that for some people, “it’s an annoyance.” If just being annoying is cause for concern, well, then I have some serious concerns about certain Maroon op-ed writers.

Mr. Murphy complains that the event is about a subculture, but how exactly is Scav insular? Every dorm (except Stony Island) had a team this year, including first-time Blackstone. Anyone can join any team, and with 277 items this year, there are items for the whole spectrum of U of C students. Like any activity, from RSOs to lectures to Summer Breeze, some students will participate and some will not. Why does Mr. Murphy feel that Scav must be held to the bizarre standard of appealing to everyone?

Mr. Murphy’s suggestions for better items on the list will strike any experienced Scavvie as terrible––his last idea was just some sort of bizarre coffee shop-related item, which seems to exist merely to express his apparent anger at the C-Shop. If he wants to seriously suggest items, I encourage him to apply to be a judge—most of the application is a proposed list of items. And everyone is free to submit.

Let me tell you why Scav is so much fun for hundreds of students: This weekend, I got to see a group of first-years write a song about Ted O’Neill and sing it to him in person. I saw people gleefully racing down South University Avenue in homemade ox carts. I saw a quartet of string instruments playing music on the CTA.

I saw students from throughout my dorm––students who had never spoken to each other—get together to cook, build, Photoshop, film, and act. I saw excited groups of people eagerly working together on fun projects, and having the time of their lives.

If Tim Murphy wants to ignore Scav, he can do so––but as a person who clearly has little to no experience with it, he is not in a position to tell us Scavvies how to change our favorite weekend of the year.

Ezra Deutsch-Feldman

Class of 2010

Captain, Team MacPierce