The University of Chicago’s Independent Student Newspaper since 1892

Chicago Maroon

The University of Chicago’s Independent Student Newspaper since 1892

Chicago Maroon

The University of Chicago’s Independent Student Newspaper since 1892

Chicago Maroon

Uncommon: Grace Lin

Grace Lin, a fourth-year in the College, is a known politician both on and off the U of C campus. In addition to her post as president of the College Republicans, Lin is the elected 20th Ward Republican committeeman in Chicago.

CM: You’re a triple major in math, economics, and statistics, very active in extra-curricular activities, and an elected official in the local government. Have you always been so involved?

Grace Lin: I was part of 42 clubs at my high school, basically everything except theatre. I have since toned it down. Right now I’m involved in College Republicans, the Parliamentary Debate Team, Asian American Students for Christ, and I help lead prayer ministry at the Hyde Park Vineyard Church.

CM: Do you sleep?

GL: Some people say I do, and some people say I don’t. I am flexible; it really depends on how much work I have the next day. I have just as much free time as everyone else really. It’s more about organizing your time and being efficient.

CM: When you became Committeeman of the 20th Ward, you became the youngest Republican committeeman in Chicago’s history. How did that happen?

GL: I went to several networking events around the city, and I was urged by fellow Republicans in Chicago to run for the position, which had just opened up. I received the legal and grassroots support I needed and won the election.

CM: Why are you a Republican?

GL: I tend to agree with the economic and social policy that Republicans put forth. In general, I believe that Republican policy is better at executing the values that Americans hold; whether it is in trusting that individuals spend money more efficiently than a federal government or putting an emphasis on national security.

CM: How about the apolitical and apathetic stance some students have taken in recent times?

GL: You can not care about politics, but you can’t be apolitical. Being apolitical has a political effect. It’s not practical and I don’t think these people realize the importance of voting.

CM: You’re pursuing investment banking after graduation. Do you have any aspirations to go down the politician road?

GL: It depends. I am pursuing investment banking because I think it is important to understand money in order to understand worldly power. A big part of politics is about money, whether it is financing a campaign to power and influence. College is the last stop of a natural progression. I do not know if I will be a politician further down the road, but if the resources and the right opportunity came up, I would consider it.

CM: Do you have any vices?

GL: I have a tendency to procrastinate by playing Tetris, and while I don’t drink, I really like junk food.

CM: If you could choose, what age would you be?

GL: Seven; things were pretty good back then. Although, different ages are better suited for different situations.

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